All posts tagged: Korea

Japanese News: Japan women’s ice hockey: first Olympic win!

Today, I will study an article about Wednesday women ice hockey game where Japan beat the unified Korean team 4-1. The context South Korea and North Korea have created a unified team in women’s ice hockey for Pyeongchang Olympics. The unified Korean team was defeated 8-0 by both Switzerland and Sweden and Wednesday’s game against Japan was a highly anticipated match. To Koreans, defeating Japan in sport is a big achievement in itself. With Japan winning 4-1, both teams had their moment of glory: Japan women’s ice hockey won its first Olympic game and the unified Korean team scored its first goal. As strange as it may sound, the arena exploded with cheers and flag-waving when Korea finally scored, as though the girls were winning a gold medal… Anyway, I was eager to read about the “historical victory” of Japan women’s ice hockey team in Japanese. I found a long article on NHK News Web: アイスホッケー女子日本が南北合同チームに勝ち初勝利 Every time I start reading a long article in Japanese, I feel discouraged and have difficulty focusing on what I am …

Japanese News: North Korean in Pyeongchang

Some hours before the opening ceremony of Pyeongchang Olympics, I have chosen an article about North Korea’s delegation. Link to the article: “米側と会わない” 北朝鮮 米副大統領と接触の可能性否定 This article mainly tells us that the delegation sent by North Korea to Pyeongchang will not take the Olympics as an opportunity to meet with Vice President Mike Pence or other U.S. officials who attend the opening ceremony. Let’s have a look at some interesting words that can be used in other contexts: We know that North Korea sends a delegation to attend the opening ceremony of the Pyeongchang Olympics. The verb to say “send” or “dispatch” is 派遣する・はけんする. This word is formal and used to say things like “dispatch an army” or “send a delegate”. But, used before a noun, it can take the meaning of “temporary”, with the idea that someone is dispatched temporarily somewhere to perform a task. For example, we can say “派遣社員・はけんしゃいん” which is a temporary worker from an agency. If a professor comes from another university to give conferences, he is a 派遣教授・はけんきょうじゅ, a visiting …

Japanese News: Moon Jae-in and the comfort women agreement.

Several articles on NHK News Web (main source) discuss South Korea President Moon Jae-in’s press conference that took place on January 10th. 記者会見・きしゃかいけん: press conference Of course, Japan media were closely watching what Moon Jae-in would say about the Japan-Korea agreement on the comfort women issue that was signed in 2015 by the two governments. This agreement is referred to in Japanese as: 日韓合意: Simply, the Japan-Korea agreement 日韓両政府の合意: Similarly, the agreement between the two governments of Japan and Korea 慰安婦問題をめぐる合意: The agreement concerning the comfort women issue 慰安婦問題をめぐる日韓合意: Japan-Korea agreement concerning the comfort women issue. 慰安婦問題の「最終的かつ不可逆的な解決」を確認した2015年12月の日韓両政府の合意: The agreement between the two governments of Japan and Korea from December 2015 that confirmed the “final and irreversible settlement” of the comfort women issue. Korea had already announced, through its Foreign Minister, that it would not ask for re-negotiation of the agreement. However, Korea Foreign Minister reiterated Korea’s wish for Japanese apologies. 再交渉・ざいこうしょう: Re-negotiation. The word 交渉・こうしょう means “negotiation”. The verb used to say “asking for re-negotiation” is 求める・もとめる which means “to request”, “to solicit for”, “to ask …

Japanese News: France not going to Pyeongchang?

I was very surprised when opening Asahi website this morning to see an article stating that France may not attend the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang if the relationship with North Korea gets worse. Let’s analyse Asahi’s article Link to the article The title is not difficult to understand: フランス、平昌五輪不参加の可能性も 北朝鮮情勢を懸念 The word underlined is Pyeongchang. I am always fascinated with how Japanese use kanji for Korean places and names, when Korean themselves don’t use them anymore (they write everything in hangeul, even Names). For example, Japanese newspaper, when talking about Korea’s actual president, would write 文在寅(ムンジェイン)when Korean do not usually use the kanji and simply write the name in hangeul. That’s interesting because Japanese could use the sole katakana transcription like they do for other foreign names. But given that Koreans do have kanji names, Japanese media prefer to use them. The problem is the pronunciation. I don’t know how 文在寅 or 平昌 would be pronounced in Japanese but it would be different from the Korean pronunciation. That’s why the Korean pronunciation is given in most cases. …