All posts filed under: learning adventures

How to add an audiobook (mp3) to your iBooks library

I said some days ago, that I wanted to buy an audiobook in Japanese and have it available on my phone to listen to it often. Well, I bought an audiobook on the site febe.jp, which is a site that sells Japanese audiobooks. I bought 世界から猫が消えたなら and I am very satisfied with it. The narrator speaks in a clear voice, other characters’ voices are made by different actors and the overall quality is really good. I will certainly make a review of it in some time. But then, I encountered a problem: I could not listen to this audiobook on my iPhone. It took me some time to figure out how to do it, so I thought it might help other people too if I explained the procedure. When you buy an audiobook on the site febe.jp, you can download it in mp3, which is a good thing because you can easily listen to it on any music player. If you are using iTunes, just import the file into your iTunes library and you can listen …

Notes on the JLPT

I took the first JLPT of the year (2017) on July, 2nd. It’s been almost a year now since I’ve started learning Japanese (with some previous knowledge of kanji thanks to Chinese that I learned years ago) and I have decided to challenge myself with the N2 level. I don’t really care about succeeding or failing at the JLPT so I thought that a higher level would be more attractive and encouraging. Here are some personal thoughts about this session. The N2 session is divided in two. The first half contains the vocabulary, the grammar and the reading part. The second half is only the listening part. Vocabulary I think that the vocabulary part is a straightforward one that does not require a lot of thinking and time: either you know the word, its kanji, its pronunciation and how it is used, either you pick an answer randomly. You really can’t afford to lose time for the vocabulary. I wasn’t good at this section, and there are two reasons, I think: Not enough words First, …

YouTubed away

I am sure I am not the only one to get lost in YouTube, going to check something relevant and ending up watching cows opening doors with their horns. YouTube really is a world in itself, where you can learn many things and loose a lot of your precious time, too. Well, I have decided that I would allow myself to get lost in YouTube only if I am watching videos in Japanese. And it works. Instead of just taking a break and/or loosing my time, I take a break and I make some listening practice and I re-boost my motivation. Working only with textbooks can disconnect ourselves with the “real” language, as it is used by native speakers. YouTube is a gift for language learners as it gives a free and easy access to tons of materials in the target language. When I hear Japanese people speaking Japanese, it boosts my motivation and makes me want to get better to understand everything they say. Today I landed on the channel HikakinTV. I think that …

Inside that dictionary (In memory of those hours lost in the keys)

Years ago, I studied Chinese. It was not that long ago, but if we compare the learning tools we have now and what we had at that time, I started Chinese in the Medieval Times. To read a text in Chinese, I had to look up words I didn’t know and the only way to do it was to use a dictionary (the one with pages you have to turn). What I do now when I’m searching for a word in Japanese is: Take my iPhone Draw that character using the handwriting in-put Choose ok What you had to do at that time was this: (Warning: I know it may seem extraordinary, but it’s true, I am talking from experience) Step 1: Find what you think is the key of the character Count the number of strokes in that key Find your key in the key table of your dictionary Go to the page indicated in front of the key Find the key on the A4 format page of your dictionary full of characters, keep …